Tag Archives: science fiction

#sundayshorts Under the Needle’s Eye- Science Fiction and Fantasy Stories


Sunday Shorts is a new meme. The rules are easy, a short story, an anthology of short stories, a novella, or a quick weekend read that is also short on your wallet!

Please join us at our Goodreads Group and see whats on our shelf! Also please add your link to the Linky at the hosts’ blog here, so everyone can easily hop from blog to blog  and read your short! This is a brand new Meme that I hope will grow! ENJOY!

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Here are a few words on each story in the anthology!

Worry Doctor, by Linda DeMeulemeester

In a future society run by institution, no child need suffer unhappymemories. The worry doctors see to that. But when Teacher Angela isasked to find a dissident, she must once more undergo mind shaping.As Angela’s discarded memories begin to surface, the veneer of herharmonious life begins to crack.

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Interview with Dr. George H. Elder, author of the Genesis Continuum Series


You may know by now that I really like SF books. So, when I got an opportunity to interview author Dr. George H. Elder, I jumped at it, as I wanted to know how SF authors go about creating their worlds, the science and all the things that make SF books wonderful. So, lets get to it, I can’t wait!

Interview with Dr. George H. Elder, author of the Genesis Continuum Series

Describe your book? What genre would you classify it into?

Amazon classified the Genesis series as Sci-Fi Adventure. The book is basically a quest story, with the key twist being that it is set at the end of time. The universe is dissolving in an entropic whimper, although many of the extant species of the time are desperate to kick-start another cycle. The question is, how? Ancient legends speak of a being of unimaginable power who once united the entire universe for an unforgettable moment. However, this “Seeker” was a very flawed being, one who exterminated over ninety-nine percent of his own kind. He locked himself in perpetual dormancy to contain his savagery, and his location was lost over the passing eons.

Missions are sent to find the missing Seeker, but some are diverted by unknown forces. One such mission ends up on a seemingly primitive planet, the home of a stone-age culture called the Labateen. Here we meet Kara, the outcast daughter of a Labateen noble. She encounters the misdirected mission, and soon finds herself as part of its crew. Thus begins Kara’s journey to find the missing Seeker. She will go through deadly battles, be aboard titanic ships, and learn that nearly everything she believed was a lie. In the end, she wants to have never been born. Then she shall arise from the ashes… but how and why would be telling.

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Fitting My History Research into My Science Fiction by Robert Collins


Fitting My History Research

into My Science Fiction

I write science fiction and fantasy. I also write nonfiction books about Kansas history. These two tracks of my writing career are separate. Occasionally I use what I research for my nonfiction in my fiction.

Take my second published novel, “Lisa’s Way.” The story is about a young woman trying to rebuild an interstellar society after an event called “The Savage Rain” isolated her world. Originally the story was set on Earth. Lisa and her friends had adventures, but there was no method to them.

In the early 1990s I published a series of travel booklets. The booklets covered the things to see and do in various counties around where I live. They also had brief histories of the towns in those counties.

A couple of those counties were along the Santa Fé Trail. The Santa Fé Trail was a commerce route, not a route settlers used. It connected the frontier of the United States with northern Mexico. After the Mexican War it became an important link between the Pacific Coast and the U.S. until the transcontinental railroad was completed.

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What’s in a Creature? by K. B. Hoyle


What’s in a Creature? 

Three years ago, when I started actively working on the first book in The Gateway Chronicles, The Six, it came into my mind that if I was going to write a successful fantasy series, I had to create at least one new fantasy creature. I felt this was also a big gamble, as it could either read well and people would like it, or it would read cheesy and be the downfall of my books. You might immediately ask yourself, “Why does this matter?” but think about some of the most successful fantasy stories out there. The Lord of the Rings has its hobbits and wargs, The Chronicles of Narnia its marshwiggles and dufflepuds, and Harry Potter its house elves and dementors (just to name a few). Even The Hunger Games, which is not technically fantasy, has its mutations and mockingjays. Creating new creatures helps “people” (no pun intended) a new realm, and not only makes it more enjoyable for the readers (as they discover something new), but also helps them suspend disbelief (crucial for any fantasy / scifi / dystopian / paranormal story). So, while certain stock creatures should also be used —fairies, gnomes, nymphs, etc. depending on the subgenre—new creatures are, I believe, of crucial importance.

I’ve created a few new creatures for The Six, but the one that took the most careful planning was the nark. At the camp on which the stories are based, there is a saying that if you stay out too late, the “night narks will come and get you.” I never knew what these “night narks” were supposed to be, but as I sat down to plan The Six, that was the term that immediately popped into my mind for a new creature. But then, I reasoned, if there are night narks, there must also be day narks, and what’s going to be the difference between the two? And what are they in the first place? I’m also a teacher, and we often say that in teaching, we should start with what is known and move to the unknown. In that, I decided to, at their base, make the narks a sub-type of creature that is already known—elves. And not Keebler elves, but Tolkienesque elves. In that sense, they are human in form but with large pointy ears and tend to be exceptional at performing various tasks. From there, I moved into the unknown. I decided that night narks and day narks were to be two sides of the same coin—or two different personas inhabiting one body. Night narks are awake at night and day narks are awake during the day, and they share information between the two personas in the transition between day and night. Their physical appearance, also, lightens and darkens between day and night. Now, there is much, much more that I could go on to tell you about the narks, but it would be far too exhaustive for a simple guest post, and then you would have nothing to discover for yourselves about them if you are to read my books! All I will say, however, in wrapping this up, is that my gamble seems to have paid off. Of all the elements in my books, the narks were what I was most nervous about, but they have also received the highest praise and the most remarkable comments from those people who have already read The Six. “The narks are awesome!” and “How did you come up with that?” are comments I’ve received over and over. This has only firmed up my belief that the creation of new creatures in a fantasy story is not only highly important for the successful creation of a new realm, but also highly enjoyable for the reader.

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Interview with Emily Mah Tippetts, author of Someone Else’s Fairytale


As you may know, Emily’s Someone Else’s Fairytale was the first and only chicklit I have read (You can find my review here). And, she writes fantasy and science fiction besides chicklit! I have no idea what was going on in my mind, LOL. But, I seem to have liked the book, so I was quite interested in finding out more about this wonderful and multi-talented writer. Here’s a tidbit I learned from talking to her. She knows Orson Scott Card. Yes, personally! So, lets dive in to find out more!

Interview with author Emily Mah Tippetts

Describe your books? What genre would you classify it into?

I write light romance or chick lit, which to me means I do happy endings, and thus spend most of my writing time trying to devise twists and turns that will keep the reader interested and an ending the audience wants, but not in the way they expect. Those are the ideals I strive for, at least.

How did you come up with the idea for Someone Else’s Fairytale?

I was browsing entertainment headlines and not really understanding what all the hype was about. It occurred to me that if I got hit on by a celebrity, that could complicate my life, and that was the genesis of this idea, an ironic take on fairytales.

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