Memorable Characters? Who Needs ‘em? by John Zunski


Memorable Characters? Who Needs ‘em?

by John Zunski

I was recently asked during a radio interview about characterization. Wait, let me back up…  unless you’re already a fan and you’re reading this you maybe wondering who the hell is John Zunski and why should I care?  My short answer: If you like memorable characters, it might behoove you to introduce yourself to my imaginary friends. They make their residence in Cemetery Street and Shangri-La Trailer Park.

In my humble opinion, great characters are high octane fuel for the story engine. Without deep characters a high-performance plot will ping and knock. Not to mention, memorable characters come with their own stories. Think about your family, friends, or neighbors: the memorable ones all have great stories, or even better, they have unique if not bizarre traits. Ask Barnum and Bailey, they made a name for themselves promoting such characters.

“John, they exploited those poor folks.”

Maybe… but, let me ask you this.  Who’s more interesting?

Granny A is navigating a shopping cart through crowded aisles. She’s tired, the two year-old throwing a tantrum in the candy aisle annoys her, and the inattentive parent angers her, but she says nothing and politely ambles by.

 Granny B hops onto an electric shopping cart. She hangs her cane from the handle bar and pulls in front of young couple pushing a cart. “Watch where you’re going,” she snaps. She finds a crowded aisle and steers down it. “Get out of my way,” she barks grabbing her cane, threatening to poke those in front of her. “I’m in a hurry; I don’t have much time left.”

I don’t know about you, I would rather know Granny A, she’s probably a dear person and bakes great cookies, but, boring! Without question, I want to read about Granny B. I find myself wishing that if I make her age that I’ll have such gumption.

“John, that’s well and good, but Granny B isn’t believable.”

Dear reader, you haven’t shopped at my local Wal-mart.

 Please help me save my sanity; help stop me from shopping at Wal-mart. How? Check out Cemetery Street. You may fall in love with my imaginary friends, and then I could shop at a real grocery store.

~~~~~~~~~~

About the author

Author of  Cemetery Street, a tear-jerking tale of love, loss and friendship,  Shangri-La Trailer Park, and the soon to be released Nightwatching.

Originally from the ‘mean streets’ of Suburban Philadelphia, John sailed across the prairie in a U-haul in 2003 and settled in the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana where he lives with his wife Tammy, step-daughter Tiffany, their two dogs and an occasional meandering bear.

You can also look me up on  Facebook  or Google +

~~~~~~~~~~

About Cemetery Street

In a place where dreams are possible and nightmares come true, can you romance a memory? James Morrison thinks so. In a snowy cemetery, James reenacts a childhood ritual, unleashing an avalanche of memories. Laugh, cry and blush with James as he recounts a late twentieth century American life. 

~~~~~~~~~~

Advertisements

So, what do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s